Broke? Texas school chiefs doing well.

Many economists are warning that we are about to fall into yet another official contraction of the economy. But don’t worry about your almost-sainted it’s-all-for-the-children local public school superintendent.

“The average salary for a Texas public school superintendent increased by 3.5 percent for the 2012-13 school year, according to a survey by the Texas Association of School Boards and Texas Association of School Administrators,” reported the Abilene Reporter-News.


The average salary for a superintendent in Texas for the 2012-13 school year is $127,358, a 3.5 percent jump from 2011-12.

According to the report, 744 Texas school districts were surveyed and 72 percent of those responded. And what did we learn from those responses? We learned that, while school districts are claiming to be broke and are using our money to sue us to get more of our money, “…the average salary for a superintendent in Texas for the 2012-13 school year is $127,358, a 3.5 percent jump from 2011-12,” according to data presented by the Reporter-News.

We’ve also learned from the story that “Superintendents that [sic] oversee less than 500 students average $86,782 and those that have more than 50,000 students earn on average $281,722.”

I wonder if the classroom results, all that should matter in public schooling, obtained by school chiefs in very large districts are three and a quarter times better than those achieved in the very small? That’s how much more they are being paid – about three and a quarter times more on average.

And since it’s all for the children, I’m sure you will have no problem paying your school administrators even more – while they sue you to get more of your money and lobby the Legislature to even further reduce accountability systems that show us their effectiveness.

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