Democrat Poll Workers Plead Guilty to Voter Fraud

Democrats in Texas and elsewhere routinely claim that voter fraud doesn’t exist. But two Harris County Democrats caught stealing votes have proven those deniers wrong, again.

Latunia Thomas and Jeanene Johnson pleaded guilty to charges of illegal voting in the May 2016 primary runoff election.

Working together at the polls, Thomas forged her daughter’s signature in the poll book and illegally cast a vote in her name, while Johnson knowingly helped Thomas sign in and cast the fraudulent ballot.

Other poll workers saw what happened and reported the women’s suspicious behavior.

“They decided to cheat, they got caught,” said Harris County Clerk Stan Stanart, the county’s top election official. “We take election integrity seriously in Harris County. Fair, honest, and secure elections are crucial to our citizens and a top priority in the County Clerk’s Office. One person. One vote. It’s the law.”

Thomas and Johnson were each charged with a felony but pleaded down to a Class A misdemeanor of unlawfully depositing a ballot. They faced up to one year in jail, but served just one day and were released, according to the Harris County District Attorney’s Office.

The two were nominated to serve as poll workers by the Harris County Democrat Party, even though both were known to have criminal records.

A Democrat operative has also implicated himself in voter fraud in Dallas County, where illegal mail ballot harvesting is the focus of a criminal investigation.

Had the Harris County polling place where Thomas and Johnson stole a vote been staffed only by dishonest Democrats, such voter fraud could have gone on undeterred all day. That’s why Texas law calls for people from both parties to serve at every voting location if possible, as election workers and poll watchers. Yet too often, election officials have a hard time meeting that staffing standard – or fully staffing the polls at all.

Texans who want to ensure honest elections should get involved at their local polling locations. Qualified voters can contact their county election officials or local political parties to learn how they can serve at the polls.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Erin Anderson is the Metroplex Correspondent for Empower Texans & Texas Scorecard, reporting on state and local issues, events, and government actions that impact people in communities throughout the area. A native Texan, Erin grew up in the Houston area and now lives in Collin County.

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